Technical sheet:

Grape Variety: 100% Pinot Noir

Country: New Zealand

Region: Central Otago

Alcohol: 14%

Vinification: After an average of 23 days on skins the wines were then pressed to tank where they were settled for 1 – 2 days before being racked into 300 litre French oak barrels (38% new). The wine was inoculated for malolactic fermentation which took place in the following spring.

Cellar Potential: 2-6+ years

Misha's Vineyard "The High Note" Pinot Noir 2014

Red Wine - Misha's Vineyard

HK $351

Order Quantity:

WHAT THE TEAM HAS TO SAY:

Ever heard of the song Bette Davies Eyes? This wine will expose you, when she shows you, off your feet with the crumbs she throws you. She's ferocious and she knows just what it takes to make a pro blush. All the boys think she's a spy, she's got Bette Davis eyes. She'll tease you, she'll unease you, all the better just to please you. She's precocious and hits that "High Note".

TASTING NOTES:

This Pinot Noir greets you with lifted aromas of liquorice, spice and dark cherry along with a more delicate perfume of white musk and moonflower. The palate is gentle, has lingering sweet fruit freshness, but still finishes with a flinty seriousness.

HISTORY:

The first winemaker attracted to Central Otago was John Desiré Feraud who came to the area during the Dunstan gold rush of 1862, and after investing in a claim became rich overnight. Feraud, who was from a French winemaking family, recognised the potential for grape growing, and leased 40 hectares in Clyde where he planted the first wine grapes in 1864. Over the next 20 years he made a variety of wines even winning a prize for his Burgundy-style wine in Sydney in 1881. His farm, named Monte Christo Gardens, was an extensive garden of fruit trees, vegetables and 1200 vines, along with a winery which still stands today.

During this period, viticulturalist Romeo Bragato also visited Central Otago and declared the area as one of great potential for grape growing. However Feraud and Bragato’s enthusiasm for grape-growing did not spread to others and when Feraud left the region, commercial winemaking ceased. Over the next hundred years, no one tried to grow grapes again and the focus for Central Otago was on sheep farming and fruit production.

You recently viewed